Dedicated to a Lean Holiday

store-crowd-black-friday-blur-615cs112212It’s that time of year again. The Christmas claymation specials are running on TV. The Salvation Army bells are ringing. The lines of early adopters are starting to form outside big-box electronic stores around the country. Recent news reports this week state there’s more anger toward businesses staying open on Thanksgiving this year; likely in hopes to attract shoppers to offset poor sales this year. The anger is primarily directed at the businesses who are “forcing” their employees to work on a holiday. I’m not quite sure why people are angry because the workers are likely volunteers who want to work; but I digress.

This post is about dedicating to a lean holiday in hopes that in doing so we dedicate long-term to a lean lifestyle. I don’t mean going on a food diet; I’m talking about a spending diet. We Americans have been raised in a consumer culture on purpose. We are told what to buy, when to buy it, and are given means to buy a lot of stuff that we might otherwise never be able to afford.

The hype behind “Black Friday” and “Cyber Monday” as a celebratory spending time is promoted to instigate you to pulling out your money and spending more that you normally would. The consumer culture is programmed to spend, and spend a lot during this time of year. Why? Most likely we’re programmed to spend because in the colder seasons there’s less spending in general. Nobody wants to go out and trudge around in cold weather, snow, etc.

To begin, you should already be on a budget. If not, you need to start with a monthly spending budget by calculating your after-tax income minus bills and expenses. For the Christmas holiday however, we should break down a budget for gifts. Determine how much money you can spend from your savings (that’s right, credit cards are off-limits) and then divide that by the number of people you’re buying gifts for. That will be the individual gift budget you will be aiming for.

A $500 gift budget ÷ 10 people = $50 max per person.

One would think this is a simple concept, but you’ll be surprised just how easy it is to spend more and more and more without tracking individual totals for each person you’re buying for. Simply keeping track of purchases in a spreadsheet on your phone or computer will allow you to maintain control over that tendency to have a holiday spending spree.

Once you successfully keep up a holiday budget, moving forward throughout the rest of the year with similar frugal spending will help you realize new savings you never thought were possible. By buying store brand instead of name brand, going out to eat once a month instead of every night, replacing trips to the movie theater with a book at home, and buying a 4-year old used economy car instead of the latest luxury car will begin to contribute to your positive savings at the end of each month. When you tally up your monthly budget (remember you’re doing one of these) I guarantee you’ll see that the consumer brainwashing we’ve all been indoctrinated with has held your savings and wealth growth back for years.

Let’s all make a commitment to dedicating ourselves to a lean holiday and continue on with a lean new year.

Desire To Succeed

Working At Night

Let’s get something straight from the start. There is no exact formula for creating a desire to succeed. There’s always going to be something that at some point will deplete your willingness to get motivated.

That being said, the number one cause for inaction towards success is in my opinion fear.

As a wise Yoda once said:

Fear leads to anger. Anger leads to hate. Hate leads to misery.

The fear of not being able to succeed, complete a project, or causing irreparable harm to one’s finances has most of us convinced that we cannot do what we want to do on our own as an entrepreneur. The fear of not being able to pay the bills if we quit our day job to pursue our dream is usually a big one. That fear leads us to stay in a safe place, usually still working for someone else and it’s understandable for some in today’s job market. But that fear… and the inability to act grows inside us…  and leads to anger. Angry that we’re not doing what we want or being who we want to be in life. That leads perhaps to a “hate” of the work that we do and eventually the misery we endure at a job where we know we may be under-appreciated or working on things that prevent us from awaking each day with blinding inspiration.

Someone I trust once said:

Be crazy. Get out of the rut and do something different. Just leap.

I however would add the following disclaimer: If you jump, there’s a launch velocity you need that cannot be achieved without a desire to soar.

Which leads me to my conclusion. Desire, is at the core of anyone that achieves success. It is the number one destroyer of fear. The level of desire has to be all-encompassing. Simply stating “boy won’t it be great when I succeed” is not enough. Your need to succeed must be like a need for air to breath.

I WILL DIE if I do not succeed!

That level of dedication can be found in those who have nothing to lose.

I do not advocate quitting your job tomorrow without any sort of direction, financial plan, or safety net in place. If you have a secure day job, make sure you have about twelve months of total expenses saved in the bank  so you can at least survive with little or no monthly income coming in while you build your business. If you’re without a job now, then you already have a financial motivator to have the burning desire to succeed at whatever you put your mind to. Focus on that goal, plan, and act. With your new-found burning desire of success you will meet your goal.

Lastly, we must not forget that your family must be on board with your desire to succeed. Many relationships are strained early on when wives and husbands are working long hours away from the family building their business. The family should not be neglected but they should know that without hard work, extra hours nurturing the business, your dream will not be actualized. If they truly care about you they will give you space to grow your business. Now get off the computer and go give your loved ones a hug!

Rethinking The Traditional Workplace

VPN InternetGenerally IT entrepreneurs think that it is a requirement to have a centralized headquarters building. Large, lofty spaces with pool tables, bean bags, and modern art on the walls.

I think this thinking is old and past its time in the IT industry. I don’t like old ideas. If your company is centering around information technology you have an Internet connection. The distributed nature of an TCP/IP network lends itself well to a distributed work force.

So why do companies still insist on the overhead of a centralized workforce? It could be that they expect their customers to want to see them in an impressive facility. This is superficial. Since when does putting up a façade of what a business should have or look like make any difference on how a product performs? It doesn’t. Perhaps it’s a way to control the company employees; ensuring that they’re working. I think this too is false as employees who are excited about what they do will want to work hard no matter where they are. Even so, there are tools and policies that can be implemented to make sure work is completed.

I look at Automattic as an example of how a distributed company should perform. Automattic has remote workers all over the world and uses a diverse set of tools to collaborate between them. Because the employees are all over the world, productivity is pretty much 24/7. Try and get that out of a centralized office space  in a single time zone! They’re a growing company and are simply doing remote right.

If there’s one thing that I can confirm as someone who has teleworked in the past, remote working offers flexibility, reduced stress, and increased savings in commuter-related costs. Talegen Media will be following Automattic in offering a remote team work experience.

Trials and Tribulations

plant-seedlingA fresh start. That’s what I needed. The old ways weren’t working. Writing what I know brought in maybe one real person a month checking out my website. I grew bored. Writing code examples got me nowhere except deeper into time debt.

Time debt. No, it’s not related to time travel. Time debt is what you get when you know you have to make something happen on a project schedule and instead you do something else. You’ve borrowed time from that project deadline to spend a night watching TV with the significant other, rambling off onto some tangential-laced web-search-session to nowhere, or surfing every department of the Target website just “to see what’s available.”

Well, I’ve given up on the old ways. My time debt is getting too large. It’s time to crunch and in doing so it’s time for a refresh on the personal blog. Gone are the code samples, tyrades on programming, music, and useless stories on technology others have created. I’m a software engineer who’s an entrepreneur.  A left-handed creative who suffers from shiny-object-syndrome. I’ve run businesses in the past. It’s about time I run my business.

This kickoff post is the beginning of a new chapter for this blog. From now on I plan on blogging about business; my business, generalities about business, but more importantly the trials and tribulations of starting and running an IT business. Yeah, it’s been done before. I don’t care. I’m writing this as a weblog of my journey. If you glean anything from my posts then I’ve done my job.

Web analytics be damned! It’s about time.